Enoch and Noah – Part 1 – completion

I am going to break the rule about short blog posts today and post the ending of part 1 of Enoch and Noah. I hope you enjoy it.

Just as Grampa finished that prayer, there was a loud creaking sound and movement by the door. It was the DOOR! It was closing all by itself! The people that had gathered on the outside began yelling and rushing toward the door, but…they were too late.

The door closed with a groan, a scraping, and finally a loud thud that echoed throughout the ark.

They were on the outside and we were on the inside and suddenly it got real quiet.

No one spoke.

The animals were silent.

Then the whole ark moved!

We suddenly pitched to the left. Things were sliding across the floor and falling. Then we pitched back the other way. Something hit me and knocked me down. Pop was right there with his strong arm and he picked me up. And then…the ark steadied upright again and we could tell that we were still moving. It was really weird!

After we put a few of the things that had slid around back where they belonged, we raced up the big stairway to the windows on the top deck of the ark. All we could see was water for miles and miles. There were just a few mountaintops off in the distance.

We were alone in the middle of all of this water that wasn’t even there just a few days ago. I couldn’t believe it. It was like a dream. I didn’t even want to believe it. I thought that I would wake up in just a minute. But…. I didn’t.

The sky was blacker than anything I had ever seen; the wind was blowing so hard it was hard to stand still. It made me feel so cold with the rain coming down harder and harder. I kept thinking about all the people and things that were under that water. I just stood there hanging on the edge of the window looking out.

I couldn’t understand why they all had to…be destroyed. That made me angry, so I went to a small place on the ark that I had discovered to hide when I didn’t want to be found. I wanted to think about things for a while.

I thought about the people and the places that I knew. Grampa was right. There were people that did really mean things. I didn’t understand a lot of what went on, but I thought that those people wanted to live that way. Maybe it was ok if they weren’t hurting anyone but themselves.

But then I got to thinking about something Pop had told me. If I make something and it doesn’t turn out right or work the way I wanted it to, I could tear it apart and start over if I wanted. He told me that was what God was doing. He was going to start over. He was going to keep parts of what He made that He liked and was going to do the rest over again. It was His choice. I repeated that to myself, “It was His choice and He always chooses to do the right thing.”

I didn’t even hear Grampa come up behind me. The first thing I knew was that his hand was on my shoulder. I turned and looked up at him. He told me to follow him. He led me to where the birds were kept. The light was dim and it was pretty warm in there. They seemed to be comfortable with that. They were strangely peaceful and quiet. We found a little bench to sit on, and Grampa and I sat there watching the birds for quite a while. We used to do that sometimes at home on his favorite bench, under his favorite tree, watching the sun go down. It was almost like old times. I began to feel a lot better and was able to relax a little. Then he scooted away from me just a bit, bent down, and looked me in the eyes and said, “Enoch, I am sure that all of this is frightening. It would frighten me too, and it might even make me angry…if I did not know the Lord the way that I do. That helps me to trust Him. Enoch, I want you to know the Lord the same way that I do. I want you to trust Him the same way that I do.”

I looked into Grampa’s eyes. They were deep and soft and loving. I knew I could believe him and trust him. Trusting God was a little bit harder for me. Then I remembered what Pop had said. He told me to trust Grampa and to trust in the Lord.

“God is faithful,” he always said, “you just obey and wait and see.”

Grampa had said the same thing many times. Suddenly, I felt like I wanted to trust him, God I mean.

“Grampa,” I said.

“Don’t say anything now,” Grampa said. “Would you pray with me?”

I looked down for a moment, and then back into his big eyes.

“Yes”, I said, “I would like that.”

“Hold my hands,” he said. I put my hands into his. My hands were so small compared to his. They were big and worn from many years of hard work, but at the same time, they were soft and tender.

He began to speak quietly, with confidence and familiarity.

“Lord God, God of the heavens and the earth, God of our fathers Adam and Enoch, Lord God, hear us now as we speak. I am here with my grandson Enoch. He is having a hard time trusting you; he might even be a little bit angry with you. He doesn’t know it is ok to be honest about all of our feelings. Mostly because he does not know you as I do. I know you are faithful and true. I also know that you love us each more than we could ever realize. Please help my grandson Enoch to know you as I do. Help him seek you and to know you as his great, great, great….great grandfather Enoch knew you. Help him to trust you and to know you are faithful. Thank you Lord, for I know you will hear and answer this prayer.”

With that, he squeezed my hands, and I knew it was my turn to talk to the Lord.

I was scared.

It’s not every day you talk to the God that created the universe, but Grampa knew Him so well and trusted Him so much I wanted to try.

I started the same way Grampa did.

“Lord God, God of the heavens and the earth, this is Enoch, and I’ve never spoken to you before because I…I…well, I just didn’t know I could. Now I know I can. I have learned that from my Grampa and I just want you to know I want to trust you in the same way my Grampa does. Please help me because I’m pretty young…and, well, I’m really new at this. Please help me to trust that you’ll take care of all of us in this ark and one day soon we can live on land again.”

Grampa laughed a little, but I kept going.

“Thank you, Lord, for loving us. Thank you for loving me and my family. Help us to take good care of all the animals. Especially help me to take care of all of the birds. There are more birds here than I’ve ever seen in my whole life.”

“Anyway, thank you Lord. Please forgive me for being angry with you. Please help me to do my part of trusting you to take care of everything else on the outside of the ark. I know it’s my job to just trust and obey you.”

Then Grampa put his big arms around me and gave me a real good hug. He looked me right in the eyes and said, “God is faithful, just you wait and see.”

I gave him a big smile and said, “Ok, Grampa, I’ll do my best. The Lord has to help me, but I will try very hard and trust Him.”

“God is faithful,” he said, “just you wait and see.”

Then he walked away. I sat there with the birds for a long time thinking about all that had happened. I felt more peaceful than before. I, somehow, just knew that things would be all right. But, our voyage had just begun.

 * * *

If you like these stories, consider buying my book on Amazon. It has this and many other stories.

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Enoch and Noah Part 1 – continued 2

While all of that was going on, Grammie Naamah, my mom, my two aunts, and all of my sisters and cousins were helping get our stuff onto the ark. I had to tell them what I wanted to bring and what could be left behind. This was starting to get a little scary. It was really happening! For a while, it was sort of like…a dream! But, now…it was way too real. How was this ark going to float with all of these animals and us inside? How were we going to take care of all of these animals?

Grampa must have noticed the way I was feeling. He came over and pulled me aside. He squatted down next to me and looked me right in the eyes.

He told me there was nothing to be afraid of. The Lord had promised to take care of us, and He always kept His promises. “God is faithful,” he said, “just you wait and see.” And then, he gave me a real big hug. I felt better.

Then I saw Pop watching us. He smiled, came over, and hugged me too. He told me to trust Grampa and to trust in the Lord. “God is faithful,” he said, “just you wait and see.”

Pop then told me I had been doing a much better job of being dependable. He was going to count on me to take care of all the birds, not just the chickens. He was sure I could do it. He put his hand on my shoulder and smiled at me. I was so happy, I felt like my heart was going to bust out of my chest.

There were a lot of animals on board. So I got really busy taking care of all the birds. I needed to care for them the same way I took care of the chickens at home. It was the same job, only it was a lot bigger than before. I went up to where they were kept to sort of look around, and I couldn’t believe all the different types of birds. I still had no names for them, but boy, were some of them beautiful. They were different shades of every color in all sorts of combinations and, boy, were they noisy! Each one seemed to be talking or singing or chattering in some way. It was noisy, but beautiful.

We had covered the floor with sawdust and wood chips left over from the construction of the ark. That helped a lot with the mess the animals left on the floor. We also had a lot of hay to use both for food and to cover the floor. That way the animals could lie down and sleep at night.

Then, after the seventh day, the animals stopped coming. It was weird after they had been coming for so many days.

Then it got really cloudy outside. These clouds were darker than I had ever seen before, and soon it was almost like nighttime. The wind blew harder and harder, and then…water started falling from the sky. I’d never seen water fall from the sky before. Then it came down harder and harder. It came down so hard we could barely see a stone’s throw away.

I ran to Grampa and asked what was happening. He told me the Lord had told him about the water from the sky. Grampa called it rain. He said it would continue for forty days and forty nights. All the water would destroy the whole world that we had known. He called it a flood.

Then something really weird happened. I looked out the door. I could see that the water was everywhere. It was beginning to cover our farm. People from the city and surrounding farms started arriving, and I could see that they wanted to come with us. Grampa, Pop, and my uncles came to the area near the door, and Grampa began to pray. He said, “Oh Lord of heaven and earth. You have blessed us all beyond measure, but we have rebelled against you. And because of this rebellion, you have chosen to destroy the earth by a flood. But you have also chosen your servant Noah and his family to care for the animals that you have sent to us. You have instructed me to build this ark. My family and I have done so. The animals that you have chosen have arrived. They are safe inside this ark, which we built according to your command. The rains have begun. The flooding has begun and we, your servant Noah and his family, are safe inside. The rest is up to you Lord. We place ourselves in your hands Almighty God. Do with us as you will.”

 * * *

If you like these stories, consider buying my book on Amazon. It has this and many other stories.

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My First Writers Conference – A Report

The 2014 Northwest Christian Writers Renewal Conference

I almost didn’t go. Fear of the unknown and noisy crowds of people that I didn’t know nearly kept me home. But, I had volunteered to help out with a couple of things and they had gifted me with a scholarship…so, I was on the hook. I couldn’t back out without leaving someone with volunteer spots to fill or seeming not to be appreciative of the scholarship. So, Friday morning, I bit the bullet, stuffed my anxiety level, packed up my stuff and headed out into the unknown.

The conference was entitled “2014 Northwest Christian Renewal Conference” and it was being held at a monster sized Overlake Christian Church in Redmond, Washington. I had been there before (several years ago) for an AWANA conference. That helped with some aspects of my nervousness. I stopped for some coffee at Starbucks and then I slogged through a small part of the late Friday morning traffic rush. Google map navigation guided me safely to the church (I didn’t say I remembered how to get there).

When I walked into the building, I was immediately greeted with friendly smiles and hellos from people I knew from my small fiction writers group. Anxiety began to loosen its iron grip on me. I got my name tag and syllabus and went to find a place to sit so that I could figure out where to go and what to do. I was greeted by more people that knew me from my Facebook interactions with the larger Northwest Christian Writers group. Anxiety began to melt some more.

One of the big things for me was being able to check in with a Facebook friend of mine that had recently moved back from Texas to start a new publishing company. I had not lain eyes on her for a long time and wanted to congratulate her on her recent engagement. That was a nice moment, I began to feel more like I belonged.

I arrived late on purpose so that I could skip the large group sessions. I have issues with the noise levels of large group meetings.

My first session wasn’t until 11:00am so I had some time to wander around a bit and get myself settled in the environment. I got to visit with some other friends and was feeling pretty comfortable by the start of my first session. I also need to say that I am really comfortable in most classroom situations. It’s one place where know what the focus is and love interacting with whoever the teacher might be.

My first session was hearing Vanessa Brannen speak about Writing for an Audience of Two: The Importance of Personal Writing. She focused on how this type of writing is between you and God. It is written without the intent of sharing it with others.

Some topics included:

  • Why should you journal?

○       An interesting note here was that journaling actually has health benefits.

○       It helps with decision making, increased mental clarity and improves your relationships with others by providing you with a constructive outlet for your daily frustrations.

  • How should you journal?

○       Diary

○       Morning pages

○       Personal devotions

  • Tools and references

○       Notebook and pen

○       A number of apps, programs and web based journaling sites.

 My takeaway from this session was that there are benefits to regular, structured writing that I am not reaping. I need to work out a strategy that incorporates it into my daily schedule.

Then I went to hear Diana Savage teach about Self-Editing Tips and Tricks. She has spent years in the writing and editing business and I could tell that she was teaching from the heart of that experience. Some topics included:

  • Types of Editing.
  • Info on Copyright law
  • Style Manuals
  • Books on Grammar and Editing
  • Finding an editor

She emphasized the importance of using strong action verbs and avoiding the use of adverbs that end in -ly. Good advice. She also stressed the importance of using active rather than passive voice and careful proofreading. She also pointed out that the gold standard for dictionaries is the Merriam Webster as is the Chicago Manual of Style for other things.

My takeaway from this session was reinforcement of the need for excellent editing. You can avoid a lot of editing issues by taking care while you write.

I was also blessed to be able to take in the session on Perseverance and Providence in the Writer’s Journey with Darlene Panzera. I have had the good fortune to hear this speaker before and enjoyed her more this time. Her points included definitions of her title words:

  • Perseverance:

○       persist

○       continue

○       keep at it

○       keep trying

○       stick with it

○       carry on

  • Providence

○       God

○       God’s guidance

Then she asks some very cogent questions:

  • What do you love to do?
  • What are you gifted to do?
  • How do you find time to write?
  • How bad do you want it?
  • What are the things that discourage you and keep you from pursuing your goals?
  • In what ways can you eliminate the distractions?

She accompanied these areas of discussion with the story of her own path to publication and how she has persisted in keeping that going for the last few years. She was inspiring and encouraging.

My takeaway from this session was hang in there and just keep doing what God has called you to do. Persevere, persist and honor the gift He gave you.

I mentioned earlier that I had volunteered for some tasks. They were being a room host for two speakers. My first one was Starting Your Writing Journey with Diana Savage. Her topics included:

  • Identifying Your Choices – Deciding what you want to write.
  • Develop the Craft – Turning your talent and desire into a marketable skill.
  • Approach the Market – Tips on getting your foot in the door.
  • Creating a Platform.
  • Becoming a money making writer.

My takeaway from this session was working with intentionality. Being smart and thinking about the direction you are headed as a writer can yield great benefits down the road.

I did not stay for the dinner and dessert Friday night, even though it was included in the conference package. After really enjoying the first day of the conference, I did not want to cap the day with the unpleasantness of having to face a large, crowded noisy room. I had also run out of insulin after taking my lunch shot, am not supposed to be driving after dark and needed to go home to feed my cat. You see, I had my quiver full of valid reasons to avoid what I feared.

I arrived in time on Saturday morning to catch Sally Apokedak talk about Weaving in Your World View (aka Christianity without Clobbering). She is a delightful speaker and came equipped with numerous examples of  MG & YA novels that were able to weave faith into the work without being preachy. She came prepared with excerpts to read with a discussion of what did and did not work well.

My takeaway from this session was a reinforcement that excellent books can contain Christian messages without beating people over the head. That is something to work for in my writing.

Next on my agenda was a fun workshop with Kathleen Kerr entitled Voice: What You Can’t Learn from a Workshop. Armed with excerpts from a variety of excellent and unique writers, Kathleen had us guess who wrote which excerpt so that we could compare and contrast some completely different and effective voices of successful authors. She had a unique exercise in which she presented us with two different translations of the twenty third psalm that had completely different voices. Her topics included:

  • Pay attention to what you read.
  • Stop writing for your tenth grade English teacher.
  • Write a million words.

○       For an example of how continuing to write will improve your voice and help it become unique, she showed us two paintings by the same very famous (and unique) painter. Picasso. Google images of his work from his “Blue” period and compare them with his more famous later works. There was a lot of work that happened between the two works and only doing that work could have caused the artist to grow into his own and completely unique style.

 My takeaway from this session was write, write, write. Don’t spend time copying others. Be yourself as you write, write, write.

Next was lunch and the panel of experts. I found the lunch to be very good but, as the room filled with people and becoming noisier, I found my anxiety level rising so I retreated to an area of the hallway the had tables on which I could setup my Chromebook and listen to some quieting music. I am grateful that area was available and that Overlake provides an excellent wifi hookup. That allowed my to get back into a good place and set me up to enjoy the final workshop for the day.

For my final session I was assigned to be room host for Mark Cutshall speaking on The Four Keys to Co-Authoring. I was conflicted because I also really wanted to attend part of the workshop put on by my friends Lynnette Bonner and Lesley Ann McDaniel. Fortunately, the rooms were very close together, so I got the recorder to Mark Cutshall and grabbed a seat in the workshop entitled Indie Publishing – Market and Distribute Like a Pro handled by Lynnette.

My takeaway from this session was how knowledgeable and helpful Christian writers are with one another. It is always so refreshing to know that, in this community of writers, there is a genuine sense of pulling each other along rather than scrambling over one another in some mad competition for sales.

I could not have predicted how much I would enjoy and be blessed by this conference. I could not believe how generous and helpful and friendly everyone was. I appreciate the scholarship so much more now than I did before because I can see the benefits so much more clearly now. Thank you to the leadership of the Northwest Christian Writer’s Association for the gift of the scholarship. I plan to put all I learned to work this year in my writing. I am glad I went.

 

Enoch and Noah Part 1 continued…

Today we will continue with my story of Enoch and Noah from my book, “The Kid Inside Bible Stories”. They were written originally to be told aloud. Try it with your children or grandchildren.

One time when it was late at night, we were all asleep, and Grammie Naamah came to our house and pounded on our door yelling, “Fire! Fire! The ark is on fire!” We all jumped up out of our beds and ran toward the west meadow. We could see the glow in the sky and the flames as soon as we passed our gate. When we got there, we could see all of the lumber and supplies were on fire and some flames were moving up the side of the ark.

Pop sent me down to the creek that ran through the meadow and told me to stay there, fill buckets with water, and keep filling them until the fire was out.

My cousins grabbed the empty buckets and brought them back to me to re-fill.

I filled them over and over and over again. I began to get so hot and tired I thought I was going to die. I wanted to quit so bad. But I knew I had to keep going. I couldn’t disappoint Pop or Grampa again.

We kept it up for what seemed like hours and hours. I must have filled more than a thousand buckets.

Each time I thought the fire was finally out it would shoot up again somewhere else. I could see my Pop up at the top of the ark, pouring bucket after bucket of water down the side.

I knew I had to keep filling those buckets. Everyone was depending on me to keep them filled.

It was a long time before the fire was out. We all gathered around the ark to see if there was much damage, and fortunately, there wasn’t much. It was mostly the scaffolding and supplies that were destroyed. The side of the ark looked worse than it actually was.

We gathered around and prayed for a while, but I couldn’t help wondering why the Lord would allow this kind of thing to happen if this was really His project.

Now I knew that the people around us not only thought we were crazy, they were frightened enough of us to try to keep us from building the ark. But we just kept on building anyway. “God is faithful,” Grampa said, “just you wait and see.”

Grampa has always been like a special friend to me. We’ve done a lot of stuff together and he also likes to tell me about the Lord.

He and the Lord seem to be pretty good friends. Grampa says that he talks to God a lot. He says that God talks to him too. He said the Lord told him that the whole world was going to be destroyed because it was so bad.

He doesn’t tell me a lot about all of that badness. He says I’m better off not knowing about it. He says we can talk more about it when I get older.

Some of the boys I know have told me some stuff though, and it is pretty disgusting. Yuck! I don’t even like thinking about it!

Then came the day Grampa told us that the Lord had told him we would be loading up the ark soon for our trip in it. Wow! He and Pop and my uncles have been working on this thing for over a hundred years, and it’s really weird to think about it being finished.

When Grampa was talking to everyone about it yesterday, he told me my job would still be taking care of the chickens and “a few more birds.” That’s when he told me about all the different kinds of animals that were going to be coming with us.

I almost laughed because there weren’t any of those animals up here in the high desert. He told me not to worry about that. The other animals would come and it was my job…our job to take care of them. “God is faithful,” he said, “just you wait and see.”

Evidently the animals won’t tell God no, either.

Then I got to thinking about all the extra birds and remembered the big area toward the top of the ark. It was like several really big rooms without walls. We had hauled in and mounted a bunch of different sized dead trees, so they would have someplace to roost if they wanted to. Then I remembered the stuff called fish net Pop had hauled up there. He said it would come in handy for keeping the birds where they belong. That was a little confusing to me because the net stretched from the floor to the ceiling and everyone knew chickens can’t fly. But, I had lots of other things to do, so I had no time to think about that.

The next day, right about the time the sun came up, Grampa came and woke me himself.

He said, “Today is the day, Enoch.”

“Today is the day for what?” I said.

“Today is the day the animals will begin to arrive. We need to be ready.”

“How do you know that, Grampa?”

“The Lord told me, and He is faithful, just you wait and see.”

Grampa was right. Even before breakfast, the animals began to arrive. They came in pairs. Grampa had me counting them to keep track. There were lions, pheasants, elephants, tigers, cows, horses, sheep, oxen, cats, dogs, monkeys, bears, and even snakes and all sorts of animals I had never seen before. They showed up…all by themselves. Pop and my uncles pointed them into one of the many, many pens or stalls that had been built. There was no fighting. It was amazing!

As for me, I couldn’t believe the numbers and types of birds that began to show up. Pop had gotten the netting up only a day or two before, and all of the birds either flew in or walked right into the big room we had prepared for them. I couldn’t believe it. This went on for seven days. Grampa was right. The Lord was being faithful. He was bringing all of the animals to us!

 

If you like these stories, consider buying my book on Amazon. It has this and many other stories.

http://tinyurl.com/nxwps7f

 

Enoch and Noah – continued

Sorry for the break between installments. I attended a writing conference and have been writing about my experience. I will post about that soon.

* * *

You see, all of my friends (and everyone else in town) said Grampa was crazy. They said that he was especially crazy to build the boat. There wasn’t any water to float it on here in the desert.

Grampa had spent his whole life here in the high desert, far away from any sort of town. Maybe he was a little out of touch with … things.

All I know for sure is that Pop, Grampa, and my two uncles all spend part of everyday working on it. It’s like our family thing, this boat or ark.

Every day I had to feed chickens and goats and milk the goats. I had to collect all the eggs. Sometimes I would talk to the animals when I was feeling lonely or when I was thinking that this whole ark thing was just plain crazy.

Grampa heard me talking to them one morning when I was not feeling very good about our family “project”. After I was done with my chores he took me for a walk to his favorite tree. We sat down and talked for a long time. He told me about how the Lord had really talked to him and that, at first, even Grammie thought he was crazy too.

The people that lived in the city in the valley thought his warnings about God destroying the earth were the ravings of a crazy old man. One day I was in town with Pop getting some supplies and I heard Grampa’s voice from down the street.

I walked down the street to see what was going on. Grampa was standing up in the back of his wagon speaking loudly. “Turn from your wicked ways, my friends, before it is too late!”

The crowd laughed and one man shouted back to him, “Oh yeah, what’s going to happen to us. Is your God going to wag his finger at us?” Then the whole crowd laughed some more.

Grampa kept talking, “The Lord God has told me that if you all do not repent of your sins and change your ways, He is going to destroy you all!”

That same man shouted back at him, “I don’t like your tone, old man. You better stop your preaching or something bad will happen to you.”

Grampa looked straight at him and said, “I can’t stop preaching. God has appointed me to warn you.”

The man stooped down and picked up a rock, “Well, I’m appointing myself to warn you, old man. Knock off your preaching!” And he threw the rock at Grampa hitting him on the arm. Then the others started picking up things to throw at him too.

Grampa grabbed the reins of the animals pulling his wagon and had to drive away as fast as he could. People still ran after him and threw things at him. One of them hit him in the back of his head.

Grampa told me later that part of believing in the Lord was obeying what He asked you to do even when it was hard or crazy or maybe even dangerous.

Enoch and Noah

Continuing with a serialized series of stories related to Noah from my book “The Kid Inside Bible Stories”

Enoch and Noah

Part 1

Genesis 6 & 7

I wonder exactly what Grampa means when he says his God is always there and always faithful,” I thought as I lay in the hayloft of the barn practicing a new song on my flute.

“Enoch, where are you?” The angry voice startled me.

“Uh oh, what did I do now?” I stuffed my flute into a pocket, climbed down the ladder and ran toward the door of the barn.

“I’m coming, Pop!”

I couldn’t help but think to myself, “Where is Grampa’s God when I’m in trouble?

When I got to the barn door, I saw Pop standing in the goat pen comforting a distressed goat. Then I knew what was wrong. I had forgotten to milk the nanny goats, but they didn’t forget and were making their displeasure known, loudly.

I ran toward the goat pen. “I’m sorry, Pop, I was in the barn and forgot to do the milking.” I gathered the stool, the bucket, and started milking.

“What were you doing in the barn that caused you to forget the goats…again?” he said. “Were you busy doing some work or just day dreaming?”

I kept milking the nanny goat and didn’t answer right away. Finally, I said, “I’m sorry Pop. I was thinking about something and just forgot. It won’t happen again. I promise.”

He leaned down toward me and spoke quietly into my ear, “That’s what you said last time, and the time before that.” He straightened up and spoke a little louder, “When are you going to stop forgetting and be a responsible boy?” Then he walked around to the other side of the goat, hooked a finger under my chin, lifted my face and looked me right in the eyes. “Enoch… son, you are 10 years old, and I need to be able to count on you. Please do the chores I ask you to do.”

His words burned like fire in my heart, but I didn’t want Pop to know. So I looked down again and just kept on milking.

Pop straightened up and said, “I am going over to work on the project with your Grandfather today. Don’t forget any more of your chores. I’ll check on you at lunchtime. I’m counting on you son, don’t let me down.” He turned and walked away toward the west meadow where they were building the “project”.

My hands kept milking the goat, but my eyes followed him as he walked away. I felt my throat tighten up, my eyes began to water, and my eyesight to blur.

I thought to myself, “I hate disappointing him.”

I wanted to run after him and beg his forgiveness. But I knew that the best way to get it was to earn it by doing all of my chores and doing them well. I sniffled and wiped my eyes. I continued to watch Pop walk toward the project while my hands began to milk as fast as they could.

How could I trust a God that isn’t there to help me when I need it?

As soon as I was done with all my chores, I decided to go over to the west meadow and watch Pop, my uncles, and Grampa work on the project. I ran toward a little hill that overlooked the whole meadow, and I lay down in the grass at the top of the hill facing the meadow so I could see it. It was huge.

It had been there for as long as I could remember. It was the biggest thing I had ever seen. It filled up the whole sky to the west and when the sun was setting, there was this huge, black outline I could see even from my bedroom window.

Pop told me God had appeared to Grampa and told him to build it. Grampa calls it an “ark.” He said it was a boat and would float on water. I’d never heard of a boat before.

At that moment, I wasn’t too sure about my Grampa’s thinking.

 

The Day Great Grampa Disappeared – Part 3

This post concludes the story “The Day Great Grampa Disappeared”. I really hope that you have enjoyed this story. I am going to follow this story with two stories I wrote as my take on the story of Noah and the ark. Enjoy!

By the time old man Kenan’s story was over I was finished fixing his cart, he thanked me and was on his way. I started off for Grampa’s friends house again. But, by the time I got there, Grampa had already gone.”

“Not again! Where did he go this time?” asked his son.

“We’ll get to that in just a minute. You see, Ezra’s wife had just died a few days before and he was very sad and lonely. So Grampa Enoch had spent several hours visiting with Ezra, just talking and laughing and praying. Ezra said the visit with Grampa was just what he needed and just when he needed it. He said my Grampa Enoch was the best friend any man could ever have. He also said Grampa kept telling him to put his trust in the Lord. Then he told me that Grampa said something strange about going away on a trip and that he wasn’t sure when he might be coming back.”

“Then what?” asked Lamech’s son.

“That’s all he said. I asked him where Grampa Enoch had gone. Ezra said that after a long day, Grampa liked to walk in his fields among the trees and talk with the Lord, that I should try looking for him there.

So, off I went, back to where the day started at your Grampa’s farm to the fields that were next to his home…you know, where the creek runs toward the valley where all the trees grow.

By the time I got there it was dusk, the sun was just hitting the tops of the western hills and I could see Grampa Enoch walking among the trees. I started running toward him. I had learned so much about him that day that I wanted to talk to him more than ever. Then it happened.”

“Then what happened?” asked his son.

“There was a strange cloud that formed in the open field near the grove of trees. Your great Grampa Enoch was walking toward it. It looked like he was walking with someone I hadn’t been able to see before. I called out to my Grampa. He turned, smiled and waved and then the two of them walked right into that cloud. I started to run faster to try and catch up but the cloud began to disappear. By the time I got there, the cloud was gone and so were they. I couldn’t see them anywhere. Your great Grampa Enoch and his friend were just gone!”

“Then what?” asked Lamech’s son.

“Then nothing, I never saw him again. Like I said before, it was one of the worst days of my life and one of the best.

It was one of the worst because of all the things that kept happening to me that kept me from getting to see your great Grampa. I only got a glimpse of him at the end.

It was one of the best because of all the things that I learned about the kind of man your great Grampa Enoch was. I have spent a lot of time in my life thinking about him and I have tried to be the same sort of man.

Let me tell you what I learned about him.

He was gracious, compassionate, fed those in need, gave freely, did not fear evil, was steadfast, and always, always trusted in the Lord.

Son, I want you to learn to be the same sort of man,” said Lamech.

“I will, papa,” replied his son.

“I know you will, Noah,” Lamech said. “God is faithful, just you wait and see.”